Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Tout va bien (Jean-Luc Godard, 1972)

Sunday 24 october 2021, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Tout va bien (Everything’s All Right), directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1972, 96 minutes. In French with English subtitles. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30.

Directly after the ground-breaking historical events that occurred in May ’68 in France, director Jean-Luc Godard went into a crisis. He was famous internationally, but the revolution shook him so deeply that he realized that such fame was a fraud and actually undemocratic! So Godard went into collective filmmaking, and this film was the major result of this period. These collaborations are known as the Dziga-Vertov films.
Because he had two major stars signed for the project – Jane Fonda and Yves Montand – he was able to make a big-budget experimental film that follows the journey of a filmmaker and a reporter caught up in a worker’s take-over of a sausage factory. So there is an intimate love story, but this film also steps back and looks at the bigger picture. By approaching the situation in this way, Godard, together with Jean-Pierre Gorin, are able to analyze the movie industry, society in general, how news is reported by the mass media, along with structurally undemocratic hierarchies inherent in factories and most places of work.
Certainly a bewildering movie, there is nothing else quite like it. Mid-way through the film you see the look on actor Yves Montand’s face, something like “What the fuck is going on? How did I get mixed up in this!” It is a crazy film, with a lot of humor, but also despair. There is a thoughtful and melancholy mood that hangs over this innovative flick, as Godard stubbornly continues the battle when most others have already given up, ditched the ship, and gone for the cash in post-May ’68 France. This is the kind of film you need to watch if you want to explore, understand the world around you… and also to grasp the untapped possibilities of cinema.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to screen a movie, let us know: joe [at] lists [dot] squat [dot] net

Letter from a Time of Exile (Borhane Alaouié, 1988) – The Chair (Cynthia Choucair, 2002)

Sunday 10 October 2021, Lebanese movie night: Letter from a Time of Exile (Borhane Alaouié, 1988, 52 minutes) – The Chair (لغة فرنسية) (Cynthia Choucair, 2002, 21 minutes). Both films in arabic with english subtitles. Free admission. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30

In Letter from a Time of Exile, Borhane Alaouié presents the stories of four exiles from Beirut. Their only connection is the voice of the narrator and their situation of living in exile in Europe. Told with a subtle humor, the film sketches four highly individual portraits of people, whose lives have taken unexpected turns due to the madness of the Civil War.
Borhane Alaouié, Lebanese film director from South Lebanon, died in September 2021 in Brussels. He was 80 years old. He shot his first feature film Kafr Kassem in 1974, his work was immediately recognized internationally as one of the best Arab films of the year.
Director Hady Zaccack remembers: “Borhane Alaouié was a spiritual father for me and for Lebanese cinema, this new cinema which was born in 1975. The filmmaker was the most loved of a group of filmmakers like Maroun Baghdadi, Jocelyne Saab, Jean Chamoun, Randa Chahhal… who have transformed the country’s cinematographic landscape. Its disappearance coincides with the disappearance of a modern, secular vision of a new Lebanon, far from confessionalism. His cinema, which deals in particular with social problems, exile and return, was a pan-Arab cinema with Beirut as the center of his stories, but also Egypt (It is not enough that God is with the poor, 1978). Borhane Alaouié was my teacher, the one who paved my way by telling me one day: “You have to choose between being a critic or a filmmaker.” So he pushed me to make films and see them as a critic. I owe him a lot since the day he supervised my thesis film. It was a film school in itself. His departure marks the end of an era that is withering forever… tragically.”

The Chair (لغة فرنسية) by Lebanese filmmaker Cynthia Choucair (2002, 21 minutes).

While playing Basketball, 12-year-old Nader and 8-year-old Samer rip the chair of their dead brother. Fearing their mother’s anger, they throw it in the bin. Wallowing in a sense of guilt, the two brothers go out to retrieve it, but unfortunately the chair is no longer there.
Cynthia Choucair graduated from the Lebanese Academy of Fine Arts (University of Balamand) in 1998 and holds a Master’s degree in cinema from IESAV, Saint Joseph University, Beirut. In 2007 she founded her production house “Road 2 Films”.
In 2012, her documentary “Powerless” addresses the issue of Lebanon’s electricity crisis through the testimonies of Jamal and others whose lives have been greatly affected by the persistent electricity shortage in their country.
Her documentary “Counting Tiles” was premiered in 2018 with a group of clowns who set off for the island of Lesbos to deliver laughter to refugees. These clowns are member of Clown Me In, a Beirut-based group that performs for young Syrian refugees: the children of a new generation of war.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to screen a movie, let us know: joe [at] lists [dot] squat [dot] net

Rockers (Ted Bafaloukos, 1978)

Sunday 26 September 2021, movie night: Rockers (Ted Bafaloukos, 1978). 100 minutes. Free admission. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30

Horsemouth, a drummer living in a ghetto of Kingston, plans to make money selling records. After his prized motorcycle is stolen, his plans fall through and he’s forced to adapt.
Theodoros Bafaloukos’ 1978 film “Rockers” is arguably one of the most authentic and of-the-moment pieces of cinema made in Jamaica during the halcyon days of reggae. When the film screened at Cannes on the same night as Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” a crowd of thousands bum-rushed the theater to the point where the riot police had to be called in. A review in Le Monde read: “‘Rockers’ is not a film, it is a work of art. So good it is difficult to believe, yet it is real.”
A native of Andros, Greece, Ted first traveled to Jamaica in 1975 as a freelance photographer and got arrested when he was mistaken for a CIA spy. Shortly after, he moved to the island and lived with the musicians, including his friend Augustus Pablo, who he would eventually cast for “Rockers.” The film’s stars were basically on the frontlines of reggae during a peak moment in the history of the music. “Rockers” is considered a canonical archive of the grass roots of reggae.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to screen a movie, let us know: joe [at] lists [dot] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Coming Home (Hal Ashby, 1978)

Sunday 19 September 2021, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Coming Home (Hal Ashby, 1978), 126 minutes, in English with English subtitles. High-definition screening. Free admission. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30

Directed by one of American’s greatest filmmakers Hal Ashby, this was a groundbreaking film when it hit the cinemas… and it’s another of those films whose message is even more relevant today than when it was made. Some films fade over time, and others get richer.

Coming Home stars a young Jon Voight (Midnight Cowboy), Bruce Dern (Nebraska) and Jane Fonda. It should be remembered that Jane Fonda had made a lot of enemies around the time when this film was made. She had gone to Vietnam during the war in 1972 and made pictures with the so-called “enemies”. She said the American bombings of Vietnam constituted a war crime, and denounced American soldiers as war criminals. Many Americans of course couldn’t see her point… there was a smear campaign built against her in the States; they called her “Hanoi Jane” and clamored for her neck, saying she should be tried for treason. Many would have lynched her if they had the chance.

Coming Home is based on Jane’s friendship with Ron Kovic, whose autobiographical book Born on the Fourth of July would later be made into a film by Oliver Stone. This movie came out roughly at the same time as a few other films that dealt with the effects of the war at home in America…. of the damaged soldiers who were returning. But where the other films, like The Deer Hunter, relied on “flashbacks” of the war to show its violence and horror, this film was far more intelligent… not showing any violence at all, only the devastating emotional impact.

The soundtrack is made of the music of the times (Rolling Stones, Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, etc.), but it’s especially the music of Tim Buckley (the father of Jeff) which captures better than anything else director Hal Ashby’s mood and scorching sentiment. Winner of three Academy Awards (best actress, actor and script) back in the days when the Academy sometimes took risks.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to screen a movie, let us know: joe [at] lists [dot] squat [dot] net

Iranian Movie night: Kandahar (Mohsen Makhmalbaf, 2001)

Sunday 5 september 2021, Iranian Movie night: Kandahar (by Mohsen Makhmalbaf, 2001, 85 minutes). In Farsi and Pashto, with English subtitles. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30. Free admission.

Kandahar (Dari-Persian: قندهار Qandahar) is a 2001 Iranian film directed by Mohsen Makhmalbaf, set in Afghanistan during the rule of the Taliban. Its original Persian title is Safar-e Ghandehar, which means “Journey to Kandahar”, and it is alternatively known as The Sun Behind the Moon. The film is based on a partly true, partly fictionalized story of a successful Afghan-Canadian, played by Nelofer Pazira, who returns to Afghanistan after receiving a letter from her sister, who was left behind when the family escaped, that she plans on committing suicide on the last solar eclipse of the millennium.

Kandahar was filmed mostly in Iran, including at the Niatak refugee camp, but also secretly in Afghanistan itself. Most people, including Nelofer Pazira, played themselves. The film premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, but did not get much attention at first. After 9/11, however, it was widely shown. Kandahar won Makhmalbaf the Federico Fellini Prize from UNESCO in 2001.

Synopsis: Nafas is a reporter who was born in Afghanistan, but fled with her family to Canada when she was a child. However, her sister wasn’t so lucky; she lost her legs to a land mine while young, and when Nafas and her family left the country, her sister was accidentally left behind. Nafas receives a letter from her sister announcing that she’s decided to commit suicide during the final eclipse before the dawn of the 21st century; desperate to spare her sister’s life, Nafas makes haste to Afghanistan, where she joins a caravan of refugees who, for a variety of reasons, are returning to the war-torn nation. As Nafas searches for her sister, she soon gets a clear and disturbing portrait of the toll the Taliban regime has taken upon its people.

Other movies made by Mohsen Makhmalbaf screened at Joe’s Garage: https://joesgarage.nl/archives/tag/mohsen-makhmalbaf
All Iran related events: https://joesgarage.nl/archives/tag/iran
All Afghanistan related events: https://joesgarage.nl/archives/tag/afghanistan […Lees verder]

Iranian movie night: Tehran Taboo (Ali Soozandeh, 2017)

Sunday August 22nd, 2021, Iranian movie night: Tehran Taboo (2017) by Ali Soozandeh. 96 minutes, english subtitles. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30. Free admission.

In this multi-stranded rotoscoped narrative, crackling with tension and bleak comedy, musicians and prostitutes find ways around the strict laws of their country.
“Saying ‘no’ is more important than breathing in Tehran,” one character in this impressive debut feature by writer-director Ali Soozandeh advises another who has gotten in trouble through a failure to abstain. In this criss-crossing, multi-stranded narrative, various denizens of Iran’s capital city are seen bending, fracturing and sometimes decisively shattering the strict laws of the land – particularly where it comes to sex, drugs and general submission to the patriarchy.
Soozandeh has cleverly worked around the problem not just by living abroad but through the unusual way the film is made: the movie is technically a work of animation. Like Waltz With Bashir or A Scanner Darkly, it’s made with a contemporary, computer-assisted version of what was once called rotoscoping, whereby filmed material is traced over to produce a drawn image that matches the live-action frame for frame. The result offers deniability to the participating actors. But more importantly, it creates a remarkable visual texture, hyper-realistic in terms of movement and expression but also stylised with simplified fields of colour. […Lees verder]

Latin american movie night: No (Pablo Larraín, 2012)

Sunday July 25th 2021, No (Pablo Larraín, 2012), 118 minutes, in Spanish with English Subtitles. Doors open at 20:00, Film starts at 20:30

No, a Chilean historical drama directed by Pablo Larrain and starring Gael Garcia Bernal. The film unfolds in 1988, when Augusto Pinochet, who had ruled Chile with an iron fist since coming to power in a 1973, caved to international pressure and called for a public referendum to determine whether or not he should receive an eight-year extension of his rule. Virtually everyone in the country assumes that the results will be fixed, but Renee Saavedra (Bernal), a youthful ad executive who recently returned to the country after years of living in exile, decides to take on the challenge of rallying the public’s support against its dictator through the “No” campaign. […Lees verder]

What’s going on in Chile? Sunday 1srt March

Anarchist Group Amsterdam and Joe’s Garage collective are organizing two events in Amsterdam in solidarity with protests in Chile.

Chile is one of the wealthiest and unequal countries in Latin America at the same time. 1% of the population in Chile controls 26.5% of the country’s wealth, while 50% of low-income households access 2.1%.
Despite this fact, in October 2019 the Chilean government decided to increase public transport fares by 4% ignoring its social significance. It led to the protests and the biggest civil unrest having occurred in Chile since the end of Augusto Pinochet’s military dictatorship. People’s demands quickly grew from keeping public transport fares to more broad anti-neoliberal claims. The government replied with Excessive use of force. As of 26 October, 19 people have died, nearly 2,500 have been injured, and 2,840 have been arrested. Human rights organizations have received several reports of violations conducted against protesters, including torture, sexual abuse, and rape. According to Amnesty International, “the intention of the Chilean security forces is clear: to injure demonstrators in order to discourage protest.”. In fact, they didn’t succeed and protests are still happening until the present day.

To learn more about events happening in Chile and express your solidarity please come to our events:

Saturday, February 22, 18:00, Bollox, Eerste Schinkel­straat 14-16, Amsterdam – info talk from Chile/Belgian collective
Sunday, March 1, Joe’s Garage, Pretoriusstraat 43, Amsterdam – food and movie night